Jungle and Mountain Ration

Discussions about US MREs and other US rations
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Simon2002mre
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Jungle and Mountain Ration

Postby Simon2002mre » Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:28 pm

Has anybody seen or run across reviews on these? They were used in WWII and were like the old version of the LRP. Let me know if anybody runs across them. The jungle ration was called the J- ration and the mountain was called m-ration.
Quote:
At the beginning of World War II, a number of new field rations were introduced, including the Mountain ration and the Jungle ration. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jungle_ration
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountain_ration

It would be super cool to see one of these!
Cheers,
Simon

The couple of photos I could find:
Jungle Repo.jpg
This is a Jungle Ration REPO

Mountain Repo.jpg
This is a Mountain Ration REPO
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SentientTootsieRoll
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Re: Jungle and Mountain Ration

Postby SentientTootsieRoll » Fri Oct 13, 2017 1:59 pm

I'm just surprised that they have their own Wikipedia pages, yet no one appears to have crossed paths with one. I'm really intrigued by it, though! Just another ration to keep an eye out for. If I ever do find a rare ration like that, I'm not keeping it for myself. I'd feel better about giving it to someone who would value it a lot more than I would, but I just don't know who. Between oldsmokey, steve1989, gundog4134, the Ration Museum, etc. that would be a tough call to make.

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steve1989
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Re: Jungle and Mountain Ration

Postby steve1989 » Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:37 am

Will find a Jungle and Mountain Ration specimen someday and get it catalogued for everyone to watch thru free media. Might cost a lot - my guess is they will be at some estate sale.
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ironwarning
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Re: Jungle and Mountain Ration

Postby ironwarning » Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:52 pm

Im guessing it will pop up at the most unlikely of places
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Eistee
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Re: Jungle and Mountain Ration

Postby Eistee » Sun Oct 15, 2017 3:06 pm

I saw some Mountain ration cases on the picture Housil posted of kration's collection.

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donaldjcheek
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Re: Jungle and Mountain Ration

Postby donaldjcheek » Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:27 pm

The "jungle ration" shown in the post is a modern reproduction of what the British WW2 tropical ration may have looked like.

The Jungle Ration produced by the US Army was a short lived, failed experiment. It was a group ration designed to feed four men for one day, and consisted of:
-4 oz salted, dried beef (usually replaced by four 4-oz K-ration cans of meat or a 12-oz can of SPAM)
-8 oz box "porridge" (compressed dried & precooked cereal such as GrapeNuts)
-16 oz can dried whole milk powder
-16 oz box hardtack crackers
-4 oz can instant coffee
-4 oz can cocoa powder
-2 oz envelope synthetic lemon juice powder
-15 oz box raisins or prunes (later replaced by four 2-oz K-ration fruit bars)
-16 oz can roasted, salted peanuts
-8 oz package dried peaches, apricots or apples (often replaced by a 24 oz can of wet pack fruit)
-16 oz box sugar
-four pkgs chewing gum
-four rolls Lifesavers or four packages Charms hard candy
-four packs of cigarettes
-four folders or boxes of matches
-1 envelope (about 24 sheets) of toilet paper

The entire ration was figured at just over 2 lbs per person or about 8 1/2 lbs in total (including packaging) and provided a theoretical 3900 calories per person if all items were available and consumed.

The problem was, being a bulk ration, it did not break down readily, with items unevenly distributed. One man, for instance, might receive a can of peanuts and a box of crackers as his entire day's ration, while another received a pound of sugar and a can of SPAM as his ration. Understandably, soldiers on the front line hated the ration, quickly growing tired of its lack of menu.

ww2 mtn & jungle rations.jpg


Nevertheless, the US Army Quartermaster Department purchased 9,600,000 Jungle Rations in 1942 and a further 425,000 rations in 1943. Beginning in 1943, the jungle ration was replaced by standard C, K, and 10-in-1 rations.
Last edited by donaldjcheek on Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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DangerousDave
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Re: Jungle and Mountain Ration

Postby DangerousDave » Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:31 pm

MMMM. That sounds good. I'll have that. :roll:
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donaldjcheek
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Re: Jungle and Mountain Ration

Postby donaldjcheek » Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:10 pm

The US Army Mountain Ration was a more successful experiment. The ration, like the Jungle Ration, was a group ration designed to feed four men for one day. It made heavy use of dehydrated, pre-cooked foods that were nevertheless high in calories, easily prepared, and both tolerable & easily digested at high altitudes. The ration weighed about 40 oz (per person) when broken down and provided 4800 calories if all items were consumed. Three menus were available:

Menu #1 - 12 oz can pork luncheon meat ("SPAM") & 8 oz dehydrated baked beans
Menu #2 - 15 oz can corned beef and 8 oz dehydrated potatoes
Menu #3 - 14 oz can pork sausage and 8 oz dried precooked rice

Common to all menus: 4 oz can instant coffee, 2 oz tea, 16 oz can dried whole milk powder, 16 oz granulated sugar, 16 oz hardtack biscuits, 8 oz dehydrated cheese, 8 oz compressed quick-cooking cereal (3 varieties), 8 oz box dehydrated soup powder (3 varieties), four 4-oz D-ration bars, eight 2-oz fruit bars, four 1-oz envelopes synthetic lemon juice powder, 6 oz can Carter's spread (a non-melting butter substitute), 4 rolls Lifesavers or 4 packages of Charms hard candy, 4 boxes of Chiclets chewing gum, 4 pack cigarettes, salt, pepper, and toilet paper.

The entire contents of one menu were packed in a fiberboard carton, and three cartons (one of each menu) were then placed inside a larger fiberboard box. Some 600,000 rations were procured in 1942 and an additional 1,250,000 rations in 1943. Production was stopped in 1944 in favor of C, K and 10-in-1 rations, although these were less suitable for mountain warfare.
"I think," said Christopher Robin, "that we ought to eat all our Provisions now, so that we shan't have so much to carry."

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Simon2002mre
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Re: Jungle and Mountain Ration

Postby Simon2002mre » Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:37 pm

donaldjcheek wrote:The US Army Mountain Ration was a more successful experiment. The ration, like the Jungle Ration, was a group ration designed to feed four men for one day. It made heavy use of dehydrated, pre-cooked foods that were nevertheless high in calories, easily prepared, and both tolerable & easily digested at high altitudes. The ration weighed about 40 oz (per person) when broken down and provided 4800 calories if all items were consumed. Three menus were available:

Menu #1 - 12 oz can pork luncheon meat ("SPAM") & 8 oz dehydrated baked beans
Menu #2 - 15 oz can corned beef and 8 oz dehydrated potatoes
Menu #3 - 14 oz can pork sausage and 8 oz dried precooked rice

Common to all menus: 4 oz can instant coffee, 2 oz tea, 16 oz can dried whole milk powder, 16 oz granulated sugar, 16 oz hardtack biscuits, 8 oz dehydrated cheese, 8 oz compressed quick-cooking cereal (3 varieties), 8 oz box dehydrated soup powder (3 varieties), four 4-oz D-ration bars, eight 2-oz fruit bars, four 1-oz envelopes synthetic lemon juice powder, 6 oz can Carter's spread (a non-melting butter substitute), 4 rolls Lifesavers or 4 packages of Charms hard candy, 4 boxes of Chiclets chewing gum, 4 pack cigarettes, salt, pepper, and toilet paper.

The entire contents of one menu were packed in a fiberboard carton, and three cartons (one of each menu) were then placed inside a larger fiberboard box. Some 600,000 rations were procured in 1942 and an additional 1,250,000 rations in 1943. Production was stopped in 1944 in favor of C, K and 10-in-1 rations, although these were less suitable for mountain warfare.

Thank you so much for doing research on that one!
Killed by rancid pound-cake. I know that will be on my tomb stone.


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