Salad Bar

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laughing_man
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Salad Bar

Postby laughing_man » Wed Sep 20, 2017 1:21 pm

Natick's work with New Hampshire National Guard gives insight into Soldier food technologies
https://www.army.mil/article/194026

The prototype of the "Salad Bar" is very interesting :D
One of the items tested was a compressed food bar invented by CFD's Dr. Tom Yang, which he has dubbed the "Salad Bar."

To make the bar, Yang, a senior food technologist, took fresh salad ingredients and then covered them in a honey mustard dressing. The dressing helps with vitamin absorption and taste. He then investigated technologies and made the salad into a nutrition bar that can be eaten as a meal or a healthy snack.

"The prototype Salad Bar is produced using a conventional drying process and compression," Yang said. "It is a low-weight, low-volume, shelf-stable and fresh-like vegetable mixed with salad dressing. It can be eaten as is or can be quickly rehydrated into a salad."

The bar is part of CFD's ongoing efforts to develop more dried foods as a way to lighten the Soldier's load. The Salad Bar was popular with the Soldier participants.

"It tastes like a Caesar granola bar," said Sgt. Scott Christie of the New Hampshire Army National Guard. "Well done."

"I liked the concept of the Salad Bar," said Spc. Devan Bradley from New Hampshire's Army National Guard. "I'd like to see it in an MRE in the future."

Amazingly, the Salad Bar can be put in water to rehydrate and become a salad again.

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noderaser
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Re: Salad Bar

Postby noderaser » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:39 pm

Pass!
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Re: Salad Bar

Postby alohakid » Thu Sep 21, 2017 8:32 am

laughing_man wrote:Natick's work with New Hampshire National Guard gives insight into Soldier food technologies
https://www.army.mil/article/194026

The prototype of the "Salad Bar" is very interesting :D
One of the items tested was a compressed food bar invented by CFD's Dr. Tom Yang, which he has dubbed the "Salad Bar."

To make the bar, Yang, a senior food technologist, took fresh salad ingredients and then covered them in a honey mustard dressing. The dressing helps with vitamin absorption and taste. He then investigated technologies and made the salad into a nutrition bar that can be eaten as a meal or a healthy snack.

"The prototype Salad Bar is produced using a conventional drying process and compression," Yang said. "It is a low-weight, low-volume, shelf-stable and fresh-like vegetable mixed with salad dressing. It can be eaten as is or can be quickly rehydrated into a salad."

The bar is part of CFD's ongoing efforts to develop more dried foods as a way to lighten the Soldier's load. The Salad Bar was popular with the Soldier participants.

"It tastes like a Caesar granola bar," said Sgt. Scott Christie of the New Hampshire Army National Guard. "Well done."

"I liked the concept of the Salad Bar," said Spc. Devan Bradley from New Hampshire's Army National Guard. "I'd like to see it in an MRE in the future."

Amazingly, the Salad Bar can be put in water to rehydrate and become a salad again.


laughing_man - Thanks for interesting read... like noderaser said, PASS.

mahalo

SentientTootsieRoll
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Re: Salad Bar

Postby SentientTootsieRoll » Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:09 pm

Upon opening the link, the first thing I checked was the date published to make sure it wasn't published on April 1st. :P

I'm not one to shy away from trying new things, so who knows? Maybe it will actually taste pretty good. As the article says, the soldiers seemed happy with it. I find the concept to be pretty astonishing.

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Re: Salad Bar

Postby shawker71 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 12:54 am

They are blatantly ripping off my "Osmotic Salad" from the Pizza MRE review I did. Rehydrated salad Pfft!
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Eistee
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Re: Salad Bar

Postby Eistee » Fri Sep 22, 2017 3:31 am

shawker71 wrote:They are blatantly ripping off my "Osmotic Salad" from the Pizza MRE review I did. Rehydrated salad Pfft!


At least your salad was fresh.

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Re: Salad Bar

Postby steve1989 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:10 pm

shawker71 wrote:They are blatantly ripping off my "Osmotic Salad" from the Pizza MRE review I did. Rehydrated salad Pfft!


That salad was so fresh too, Shawk! I am so jealous you got such a rare component. Only one to ever make it out into circulation. 8)


Thank you for sharing Laughing_Man - I would try it out! Unlike our friends here, my stomach can handle it. :)
Actually, I think it is a brilliant idea - sounds refreshing! But then again, maybe it's not. Only one way to know.
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Re: Salad Bar

Postby shawker71 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:47 pm

All kidding aside, the fact that the article said it could be re-hydrated really makes my stomach churn.
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donaldjcheek
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Re: Salad Bar

Postby donaldjcheek » Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:36 am

This is not the first time the US Army has tried to pass off dehydrated vegetables as the equal of "fresh."

Dessicated vegetables were issued to Union troops in the Civil War. These were a mixture of potatoes, cabbage, turnip, carrots, parsnips, beets, onions, peas, beans, and celery. The vegetables were cleaned, shredded, mixed, dried in ovens, and pressed into hard blocks. Supposedly, one cubic yard of desiccated vegetables provided 16,000 individual portions. Large blocks were issued to companies and then sawn (yes, cut with saws) into roughly one inch cubes for individual issue.

According to General George McClellan,

"Desiccated or dried vegetables are almost equal to the fresh, and are put up in such a compact and portable form as easily to be transported over the plains. They have been extensively used in the Crimean war, and by our own army in Utah, and have been very generally approved. They are prepared by cutting the fresh vegetables into thin slices and subjecting them to a very powerful press, which removes the juice and leaves a solid cake, which, after having been thoroughly dried in an oven, becomes almost as hard as a rock. A small piece of this, about half the size of a man’s hand, when boiled, swells up so as to fill a vegetable dish, and is sufficient for four men. It is believed that the antiscorbutic properties of vegetables are not impaired by the desiccation, and they will keep for years if not exposed to dampness”.

Soldiers in the field, who actually had to eat the thing, had a different opinion, calling them "desecrated vegetables."

According to one trooper (E. N. Gilpin of the 3rd Iowa Cavalry), "We have boiled, baked, fried, stewed, pickled, sweetened, salted it and tried it in puddings, cakes and pies; but it sets all modes of cooking in defiance, so the boys break it up and smoke it in their pipes!”

Charles E. Davis of the 13th Massachusetts Volunteers wrote, "It was at Darnestown that we were first made acquainted with… ‘desiccated’ vegetables… it tasted like herb tea. From the flow of language that followed, we suspected it contained powerful "stimulating"* properties.”
*from context, Davis is describing a laxative effect

John Billings, author of "Hardtack and Coffee", described it as "sanitary fodder for the soldiers... more suitable for Southern swine than Northern soldiers."

Abner R. Small of the 16th Maine Volunteers observed that when cooked, this “substitute for food” reminded him of "a dirty brook with all the dead leaves floating around promiscuously.”

Hopefully, this experiment will turn out better.
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Re: Salad Bar

Postby Nighthawk1097 » Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:51 am

donaldjcheek wrote:This is not the first time the US Army has tried to pass off dehydrated vegetables as the equal of "fresh."

Dessicated vegetables were issued to Union troops in the Civil War. These were a mixture of potatoes, cabbage, turnip, carrots, parsnips, beets, onions, peas, beans, and celery. The vegetables were cleaned, shredded, mixed, dried in ovens, and pressed into hard blocks. Supposedly, one cubic yard of desiccated vegetables provided 16,000 individual portions. Large blocks were issued to companies and then sawn (yes, cut with saws) into roughly one inch cubes for individual issue.

According to General George McClellan,

"Desiccated or dried vegetables are almost equal to the fresh, and are put up in such a compact and portable form as easily to be transported over the plains. They have been extensively used in the Crimean war, and by our own army in Utah, and have been very generally approved. They are prepared by cutting the fresh vegetables into thin slices and subjecting them to a very powerful press, which removes the juice and leaves a solid cake, which, after having been thoroughly dried in an oven, becomes almost as hard as a rock. A small piece of this, about half the size of a man’s hand, when boiled, swells up so as to fill a vegetable dish, and is sufficient for four men. It is believed that the antiscorbutic properties of vegetables are not impaired by the desiccation, and they will keep for years if not exposed to dampness”.

Soldiers in the field, who actually had to eat the thing, had a different opinion, calling them "desecrated vegetables."

According to one trooper (E. N. Gilpin of the 3rd Iowa Cavalry), "We have boiled, baked, fried, stewed, pickled, sweetened, salted it and tried it in puddings, cakes and pies; but it sets all modes of cooking in defiance, so the boys break it up and smoke it in their pipes!”

Charles E. Davis of the 13th Massachusetts Volunteers wrote, "It was at Darnestown that we were first made acquainted with… ‘desiccated’ vegetables… it tasted like herb tea. From the flow of language that followed, we suspected it contained powerful "stimulating"* properties.”
*from context, Davis is describing a laxative effect

John Billings, author of "Hardtack and Coffee", described it as "sanitary fodder for the soldiers... more suitable for Southern swine than Northern soldiers."

Abner R. Small of the 16th Maine Volunteers observed that when cooked, this “substitute for food” reminded him of "a dirty brook with all the dead leaves floating around promiscuously.”

Hopefully, this experiment will turn out better.

Wow! Thanks for the really interesting read. My grandfather is really into the civil war, his mom was a tour guide for the Vicksburg National Military Park back in the day, so we love talk to about stuff like this when we have family gatherings. :D

steve1989 wrote:Actually, I think it is a brilliant idea - sounds refreshing! But then again, maybe it's not. Only one way to know.


Gotta agree with you on this one! I think it could work. Besides, who doesn't like a soupy salad? :lol: :wink:
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